Spent grain walnut biscotti

Those of you who are regular readers of this blog may already know that, once in a while, we use spent grain from brewdays as an ingredient in some cooking recipes. Specifically, we already told you how to cook a veggie burger with spent grain. In that entry you have all the information you need to dry and store your spent grain. Once the grain is dry you have two options. One is to keep it without further processing and another one is to mill the grain to get a spent grain flour. This last option is the one we needed for the recipe we are about to tell you about, a spent grain walnut biscotti. It is something between a sponge cake and a biscuit. To mill the dry grain we used a Corona mill.

Wheat flour and spent grain flour

The recipe for this biscotti, as well as the one for the veggie burger, is based in an original recipe described in the Spent Grain Chef section of Brooklyn Brewshop website, although it has some minor differences. While in the original recipe almonds are added, we chose to use walnuts because we already had them and we also prefer them over almonds. The list of ingredients is as follows:

SPENT GRAIN WALNUT BISCOTTI

1 cup spent grain flour
1 cup wheat flour
1.5 teaspoons baking powder
0.25 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon butter
A dash of orange liqueur
2 eggs
0.75 cups sugar
0.5 cups of walnuts, sliced
0.25 cups bitersweet chocolate, chopped

Chopped chocolate, sliced walnuts and sugar

The base of this recipe are the two types of flour, from wheat and spent grain, in equal amounts. Both are mixed in a bowl with a pich of salt and baking powder. Apart from this, sugar, butter and orange liqueur are mixed in a blender. Once these ingredients are well mixed, add and beat an egg at a time. Next, add the mix of flours to the blender in thirds, beating between additions until blended to form the dough.

From top to bottom, left to right: mix of sugar, orange liqueur, butter and eggs; final dough; dough loaf before freezing and biscotti loaf after 30 minutes at 180ºC (356ºF)

Finally, to finish the dough, add sliced walnuts and chopped chocolate, mixing well with your hands or a spatula. Once you have the dough, form a log with it and wrap in plastic wrap to put it the freezer for an hour. After this time, remove loaf from the freezer and preheat the oven at 180ºC (356ºF). Once this target temperature is reached, put the loaf in the oven on a baking parchment and bake for 30 minutes. Then, remove it from oven and let it cool for another 30 minutes.

Spent grain walnut biscotti, final result

Finally, reduce oven temperature to 120ºC (248ºF), cut loaf into 1.0-1.5 cm (0.5 inches) thick slices, put them again into the oven and bake for additional 20-30 minutes. Be careful when making slices so they don’t break into pieces.

I’ve cooked this recipe several times and it is very tasty, eaten for breakfast or for dessert. The fact of being baked twice and spent grain flour give it a very interesting texture. Also, chocolate, orange liqueur and walnuts make a very nice mix of flavours. I guess you could try this recipe without spent grain flour, but I doubt the result would be so good. I encourage you to cook this biscotti, in my opinion, is a safe bet. Furthermore, you can keep it for example in a glass jar for at least a week without problems. If you decide to cook it, please share your experience with us. And if you have any doubt, don’t hesitate to post them in the comments section.

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1 Response to Spent grain walnut biscotti

  1. Scrumptious! Want NOW!

    Like

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